Audubon Vermont Staff Birdathon 2015

Charley Wilkinson

The 2015 Annual Staff Birdathon was a huge success!  We saw a record-breaking 87 bird species, walked with 16 staff, board and volunteer birders, and consumed ZERO fossil fuels. What a great day!

CELEBRATE WITH US! MAKE A GIFT TODAY

Charley Wilkinson

WHAT IS BIRDATHON?

Birdathon is one of Audubon Vermont's biggest fundraisers of the year.  We begin our journey bright and early at the Green Mountain Audubon Center on May 21st and will travel by foot and bike through forests, fields & along rivers to observe and identify as many of our feathered friends as possible within a 24-hour period.  We'll keep a record of the number and variety of species that we find, which we'll publish here afterwards!  Through generous sponsorships from friends, family & Audubon supporters, we raise essential funds to maintain our education programs, science initiatives and Green Mountain Audubon Center facilities.

HOW DO I BECOME A SPONSOR?

By clicking HERE to make a donation online today, or by sending a check to Audubon Vermont.

Last year we spotted 81 different bird species on and around the Green Mountain Audubon Center Property!

Please consider donating just $1 per species this year.   As a sponsor, 100% of your tax-deductible contribution will support programs here in Vermont:

  • Providing thousands of young people with engaging opportunities to connect with nature, scholarships to attend summer camp, and school programs throughout the year.
  • Helping landowners across Vermont manage habitat for our native bird species, many of which are declining dramatically and need our help.  We've worked with owners of over 180,000 acres already so that the songs we hear each spring can continue into the future.  

WE THANK YOU FOR YOUR ONGOING SUPPORT OF THESE VITAL PROGRAMS IN VERMONT

BIRDS OF THE 2015 STAFF BIRDATHON

  1. Kestrel
  2. Wood Thrush
  3. Great Blue Heron
  4. American Woodcock
  5. Black-billed Cuckoo
  6. Brown-headed Cowbird
  7. American Robin
  8. Ruby-throated Hummingbird
  9. Ovenbird
  10. Dark-eyed Junco
  11. Blue-headed Vireo
  12. Least Flycatcher
  13. Mourning Warbler
  14. American Goldfinch
  15. Chestnut-sided Warbler
  16. Black-capped Chickadee
  17. Red-eyed Vireo
  18. White-breasted Nuthatch
  19. Gray Catbird
  20. Hermit Thrush
  21. Veery
  22. Canada Goose
  23. Tufted Titmouse
  24. American Crow
  25. Eastern Wood Pewee
  26. Blackburnian Warbler
  27. Great-crested Flycatcher
  28. Ruffed Grouse
  29. Black-throated Green Warbler
  30. Rose-breasted Grosbeak
  31. Black-throated Blue Warbler
  32. Baltimore Oriole
  33. Scarlet Tanager
  34. Brown Creeper
  35. Red-winged Blackbird
  36. Black and White Warbler
  37. Blue Jay
  38. Northern Parula
  39. Barred Owl
  40. Pileated Woodpecker
  41. Wild Turkey
  42. Hairy Woodpecker
  43. Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
  44. White-throated Sparrow
  45. Yellow-rumped Warbler
  46. Eastern Phoebe
  47. Northern Cardinal
  48. Common Yellowthroat
  49. House Wren
  50. Mourning Dove
  51. Song Sparrow
  52. Downy Woodpecker
  53. Louisiana Waterthrush
  54. Red-breasted Nuthatch
  55. Ring-billed Gull
  56. Common Grackle
  57. Red-tailed Hawk
  58. American Redstart
  59. Yellow Warbler
  60. Barn Swallow
  61. Tree Swallow
  62. Belted Kingfisher
  63. Northern Flicker
  64. Eastern Kingbird
  65. Alder Flycatcher
  66. Warbling Vireo
  67. Savannah Sparrow
  68. Common Raven
  69. Bobolink
  70. Purple Finch
  71. Turkey Vulture
  72. European Starling
  73. Chipping Sparrow
  74. House Sparrow
  75. Indigo Bunting
  76. Mallard Duck
  77. Wood Duck
  78. Eastern Bluebird
  79. Evening Grosbeak
  80. Cedar Waxwing
  81. Spotted Sandpiper
  82. Common Merganser
  83. Bank Swallow
  84. Chimney Swift
  85. Rock Pigeon
  86. Green Heron
  87. Killdeer

Copyright  2015 National Audubon Society, Inc